5 Points To Improve Your Odd Fellows Lodge

5 Points To Improve Your Odd Fellows Lodge

A lot of Odd Fellows and Rebekahs from around California and, frankly, from other jurisdictions write to me. Most of the messages are supportive and positive. They hear our message of change and evolution, the energy and the power that comes from being active members and active Lodges.

However, I also receive messages – some from DMC members and some from folks who are not members of DMC – that are sad and discouraged. I heard from a long-time Rebekah who is so discouraged with her Lodge that she is prepared to not renew her membership and to phase out. She says the meetings are boring and unproductive – nothing really gets accomplished. She has energy and ideas, but they are rejected out of hand, and she feels her creativity is stifled. An Odd Fellow has written to me complaining that there is too much “clashing of personalities” going on in his Lodge and at his meetings – “too much back-biting and too many power plays.”

Wow.

When did we forget that the Independent Order of Odd Fellows is all about FRIENDSHIP, LOVE AND TRUTH? When have we grown so detached and so focused on our own selves and our own agendas that we forgot to speak openly person-to-person to our brothers and sisters? When did we decide that we had to pass along a “rumor” about a brother or sister, rather than candidly and directly speak to the affected brother and sister? When was the quest for “power” in the Lodge or in the Order so great that we could criticize or diminish or hurt a Lodge brother or sister?

A little self-reflection is always in order. We are here to “elevate the character of man”. Let’s make sure to start with our own character.

Lodges should be welcoming and comfortable refuges for our members. Lodges should be places where we support one another.

Let’s resolve that:

  1. No idea proposed by a member is “stupid” or “silly” or “unworkable”. Every idea is worthy of consideration and discussion. Ultimately, the idea may be accepted, modified or rejected. But let’s give our proposing brother or sister the courtesy of fair consideration.
  2. No brother or sister should be talked about behind their back. Let’s give our brothers and sisters the courtesy of direct face-to-face conversation. If they have done something really good, take the time to tell them so. If they have done something that bothers you, take the time to talk to them about it in a friendly, open and non-threatening way.
  3. No one in the Lodge should start a rumor about another member. And if you hear a rumor, it should stop with you.
  4. No meeting should be boring or unproductive. Why have a meeting if nothing gets accomplished? Every meeting should have a focus and should move toward a goal – whether it is planning a Lodge dinner, or organizing an event to support a local charity, or planning an installation of officers, etc.
  5. In everything we do in our Lodges, we should always ask the question: “Am I doing this for the good of the Order?”

F – L – T

Dave Rosenberg

How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge

How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge

​This article is dedicated to the following subject: How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge. So, fair warning. If your Odd Fellows Lodge is satisfied with a membership of Septuagenarians and has no interest in bringing in new generations of members,...

5 Points To Improve Your Odd Fellows Lodge

5 Points To Improve Your Odd Fellows Lodge

A lot of Odd Fellows and Rebekahs from around California and, frankly, from other jurisdictions write to me. Most of the messages are supportive and positive. They hear our message of change and evolution, the energy and the power that comes from being active members...

Live Better In An Active Odd Fellows Lodge

Live Better In An Active Odd Fellows Lodge

In the articles appearing in this DMC Newsletter, we have often opined that the most successful Lodges are places that are fun for the members, socially active and involved in the community. These are the Lodges that will sustain themselves, thrive and grow. But now...

Live Better In An Active Odd Fellows Lodge

Live Better In An Active Odd Fellows Lodge

In the articles appearing in this DMC Newsletter, we have often opined that the most successful Lodges are places that are fun for the members, socially active and involved in the community. These are the Lodges that will sustain themselves, thrive and grow.

But now science has come up with another reason to be involved with fun, social active and involved Lodges: You are less likely to experience cognitive decline as you age.

Yes, it’s true. In research just published in the “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology” the scientists examined three personality traits: conscientiousness, extroversion, and neuroticism. It was noted that people who score high in the personality trait of “conscientiousness” tend to be responsible, organized, hard-working and goal-directed. People who score high in the personality trait of “extroversion” tend to be enthusiastic, gregarious, talkative and assertive. And those who score high in neuroticism have low emotional stability and have a tendency toward mood swings, anxiety, depression, self-doubt and other negative feelings. I’m sure we all know people who fit into these three personality categories. In fact, you may be in one of them yourself.

But here’s the fascinating discovery that the scientists made: Those people who scored high on conscientiousness or low in neuroticism were significantly less likely to progress from normal cognition to mild cognitive impairment as they age. And they found that people who scored high on extroversion also tended to maintain normal cognitive function longer than others.

What does all this mean in plain English? “Cognitive impairment” means your mental faculties have slowed down. The study indicated that you could delay this mental slowdown by leading a life that is more active, more fun, more involved. Certainly, being a member of a Lodge which is active, fun and involved can only help toward this goal of living a fuller, more “woke” life.

The study found no association between any of the personality traits and total life expectancy. So, an active Lodge experience will not help you live longer. But it will help you live better.

F – L – T

Dave Rosenberg
Past Grand Master
Jurisdiction of California

How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge

How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge

​This article is dedicated to the following subject: How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge. So, fair warning. If your Odd Fellows Lodge is satisfied with a membership of Septuagenarians and has no interest in bringing in new generations of members,...

5 Points To Improve Your Odd Fellows Lodge

5 Points To Improve Your Odd Fellows Lodge

A lot of Odd Fellows and Rebekahs from around California and, frankly, from other jurisdictions write to me. Most of the messages are supportive and positive. They hear our message of change and evolution, the energy and the power that comes from being active members...

Live Better In An Active Odd Fellows Lodge

Live Better In An Active Odd Fellows Lodge

In the articles appearing in this DMC Newsletter, we have often opined that the most successful Lodges are places that are fun for the members, socially active and involved in the community. These are the Lodges that will sustain themselves, thrive and grow. But now...

Three-Year Plan To Transform Your Lodge

Three-Year Plan To Transform Your Lodge

By Dave Rosenberg, PG
Davis Odd Fellows Lodge #169
Independent Order of Odd Fellows (IOOF)

While a handful of Odd Fellows Lodges in California are growing, and another handful are maintaining a static membership, the vast majority of Lodges in this State are shrinking. The math is not complicated. Members move away, depart, stop coming to meetings, lose interest or pass away – and at the same time, the Lodge doesn’t add new members or, perhaps, adds one or two new members who might be close friends or relatives of existing members. And too, often, the new members added are of the same age as existing members. The result is inevitable: Lose three members and add one member and you have a Lodge in trouble. Clearly, we must do something to change this equation.

I am often asked: What can we do to grow our Lodge?

Well, talk is cheap. Action is required. So, here, for those who are truly interested, is a three-year plan to re-charge, re-invigorate, and re-new your Lodge. (For those members of the Order who are satisfied with the status quo of your Lodge, and who are happy to maintain your Lodge just the way it is for the balance of your life, you can stop reading here.) For those members who wish to build for the future of your Lodge, and guarantee that the tenets and ideals of this great fraternity live on and flourish, please read on. The secret of success is not just to meet in closed Lodge Halls and recite ancient rituals, but rather to open our Lodges up, to increase our internal good fellowship activities and to increase our involvement and exposure in the community.

Year One

  1. Open your Lodge to the public (and to potential members) by having open, social meetings – at least one such social meeting each month. Of course, no ritualistic work is conducted and no secrets are revealed at such meetings.
  2. Bring at least one major community leader into membership in your Lodge. This can be a local elected official, a recognized business leader, a leader in his or her profession (like a lawyer), a Judge, the County Sheriff, etc. These people will raise the community profile of your Lodge and can become “rainmakers” in bringing in new members.
  3. Plan and execute one major community event, to benefit a local charitable or community group, and make sure it is publicized.
  4. Plan for and put on one social event each month for the Lodge members and their guests. This can include themed potlucks (for example, Italian potluck), “Bunko” Night at the Lodge, Trivia Night, a talk and demonstration on beer brewing, etc.
  5. Target husbands and wives, both, to consider membership in your Lodge. Ignoring half the population of your community is illogical.

Year Two

  1. Hold a “retreat” of your active members and lay out five goals for the year. These five goals should always include a goal identifying the number of Lodge applicants you intend to bring in during the year. Resolve at this retreat NOT to be negative. Positively listen to all ideas that are proposed and put on the table, and then decide which you will implement.
  2. Continue each of the Year One activities into Year Two.
  3. Develop a “signature event” that your Lodge will organize and put on for the community – which will become an annual event. For example: An “OddtoberFest”, a wine tasting event at the Lodge, Pasta Feed, a music event, etc.
  4. Organize a committee structure for the Lodge. These committees can include: A Good Fellowship Committee, a Community Support Committee, a Music Committee, a Photography Committee, etc. Give each committee an assignment and let them do their work. The committees should reflect the interests of your members.
  5. Target young potential members for your Lodge – from 30 to 40 years of age.

Year Three

  1. Continue each of the Year One and Year Two activities into Year Three.
  2. Find out what member’s are interested in doing, and do it. If members wish to take a wine country trip, figure out a way to do it. If members want to put on a Bingo night for the community, find ways to do it. If members wish to go on a hike, let them organize to do it. Etc.
  3. Contact, personally, each of your “inactive” members and let them know about Lodge activities – see if you can bring them back into active membership in your Lodge.
  4. Connect with your members. Ideally, have all members connected through e-mail so that everyone can be kept posted and informed. For those who don’t have e-mail, set up a phone tree.
  5. Target even younger potential members for your Lodge – from 16- 29 years of age.

This Plan of Action can work for your Lodge! It does not diminish, in any way, the principles of our Order. It seeks only to increase your membership, and in this way will benefit your Lodge as well as the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge

How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge

​This article is dedicated to the following subject: How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge. So, fair warning. If your Odd Fellows Lodge is satisfied with a membership of Septuagenarians and has no interest in bringing in new generations of members,...

5 Points To Improve Your Odd Fellows Lodge

5 Points To Improve Your Odd Fellows Lodge

A lot of Odd Fellows and Rebekahs from around California and, frankly, from other jurisdictions write to me. Most of the messages are supportive and positive. They hear our message of change and evolution, the energy and the power that comes from being active members...

Live Better In An Active Odd Fellows Lodge

Live Better In An Active Odd Fellows Lodge

In the articles appearing in this DMC Newsletter, we have often opined that the most successful Lodges are places that are fun for the members, socially active and involved in the community. These are the Lodges that will sustain themselves, thrive and grow. But now...

Invest in your Odd Fellows Lodge Hall

Invest in your Odd Fellows Lodge Hall

Dear Dedicated Members for Change,

When I talk to members and officers of Independent Order of Odd Fellows (IOOF) Lodges around the jurisdiction about membership development, the most prevalent question I hear is the following: “Why can’t we get younger members to join our Lodge?”

It is an absolutely legitimate question, and it is an absolutely significant concern. We have many Lodges in California where we find the vast majority of members to be in their 70″s, 80’s and even 90’s. Often, the youngest member in some Lodges is in his/her 60’s. Attracting younger members in their 50’s, 40’s and 30’s is challenging because we tend to invite and sponsor potential new members in our own peer groups and among our own friends. So a member in his/her 70’s probably knows a lot of people who are also in their 70’s – and relatively few people in their 40’s. In other words, a Lodge of septuagenarians tends to stay that way – unless someone breaks the mold.

The irony is that 100 years ago, our membership was much younger. If you don’t believe me, just check the register of members of your Lodge. You will find a membership composed primarily of folks in their 20’s, 30’s, 40’s and 50’s. Noble Grands were often in their 30’s. Today, the bulk of our Noble Grands are in their 60’s and 70’s.

So, how does a Lodge composed of senior citizens attract the next generation of members?

It’s not going to be easy, but here’s a few suggestions:

  1. Membership Development Plan. The Lodge should meet and discuss the issue, and devise a Membership Development Plan which emphasizes and encourages younger members to sponsor members from their own peer groups and friends. And older members of the Lodge should be encouraged to bring in “the next generation”. If one considers a generation to be 20 years, then a sponsoring member should be encouraged to bring in applicants who are 20 years younger than the sponsor.
  2. Activities for a Younger Generation. A moribund and boring Lodge will not attract new members. Alternatively, an active and dynamic Odd Fellows Lodge will encourage potential sponsors to bring in new members, and will encourage potential new members to apply. It must be recognized, however, that younger applicants will not be interested in the same things that the older members find enticing. Pot lucks, wine tasting trips, and bingo may satisfy the Boomers in your Lodge. But Millennials or Gen X’ers would rather go hiking, or biking, or spend time cleaning up the roadways.
  3. Recognition of Sponsors. Bringing in new members is vitally important to the sustainability of a Lodge. New members, ultimately, are brought in by existing members who act as sponsors. Lodges should make an effort to recognize sponsors in meaningful ways. A very simple way to recognize the important contribution of sponsors is to host a Lodge breakfast or dinner (perhaps once a year) honoring sponsors. In addition, it is perfectly appropriate for a Lodge to recognize sponsors in other ways, such as presenting them small plaques, small mementos, or even small stipends.
  4. Brighten up that Lodge Hall. A Lodge Hall that has peeling paint in front, damaged signage, is unkempt and dirty, and smells of cleaning fluids – ultimately will be a turn-off for potential younger members. Cleaning, painting, and brightening up the Lodge will do wonders for your image. If the Lodge looks like a retirement community, you can bet that potential members in their 20’s and 30’s will not be interested. If the first view of the Lodge is of a shabby lobby and a stairway with a chairlift – what image does that convey. A clean lobby and an elevator displays quite a different image. An investment in the future means investing money in the Odd Fellows Lodge Hall.
Independent Order of Odd Fellows - Davis Lodge #169

The home of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows in Davis Ca. This building was built in the 1950’s with the support of a generous benefactor. The interior of the IOOF building has been fully remodeled and modernized which enables our organization to attract new members.

F – L – T

Dave Rosenberg
Past Grand Master
Jurisdiction of California
Independent Order of Odd Fellows

How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge

How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge

​This article is dedicated to the following subject: How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge. So, fair warning. If your Odd Fellows Lodge is satisfied with a membership of Septuagenarians and has no interest in bringing in new generations of members,...

5 Points To Improve Your Odd Fellows Lodge

5 Points To Improve Your Odd Fellows Lodge

A lot of Odd Fellows and Rebekahs from around California and, frankly, from other jurisdictions write to me. Most of the messages are supportive and positive. They hear our message of change and evolution, the energy and the power that comes from being active members...

Live Better In An Active Odd Fellows Lodge

Live Better In An Active Odd Fellows Lodge

In the articles appearing in this DMC Newsletter, we have often opined that the most successful Lodges are places that are fun for the members, socially active and involved in the community. These are the Lodges that will sustain themselves, thrive and grow. But now...

The Responsibilities of Being an Odd Fellow

The Responsibilities of Being an Odd Fellow

Dear Dedicated Members for Change,

Does your Odd Fellows Lodge have a membership problem?

Does Odd Fellowship, in general, have a declining membership?

These issues would dissipate, if each of us, as Odd Fellows, just followed three simple precepts.

Almost everything in Odd Fellowship comes in threes.  Like the three links that stand for Friendship, Love, Truth.  So here’s another “three” for you to contemplate.   If you are a true Odd Fellow, you are responsible for three things.   First, you are responsible to yourself.   Second, you are responsible to your brothers and sisters.  Third, you are responsible to your Lodge.  Let me explain.

Being responsible for yourself.  Have you exercised the admonitions of “friendship” and “love” in your Odd Fellows Lodge?   Do you treat all members of your Lodge with the same level of friendship or do you hang with just a few, or a clique?  Do you have a pleasant demeanor in the Lodge, or are your edges sharp toward others?   Do you say “how are you doing” to other members when you see them, and do you really mean it?   When members are ill, or bothered by life’s challenges and vicissitudes, do you lend a friendly ear or a loving hand to help?

Being responsible for your Lodge mates.   When you joined Odd Fellowship, you didn’t join a club – you joined a fraternal Lodge.   A true Odd Fellow takes an active role in the activities and governance of the Lodge.   Do you attend meetings and events, or do you just pay your dues once a year?   Do you volunteer to help the Lodge in hosting events, or working in the kitchen, or setting up and cleaning up at events?   Do you rely on other members to get things done, or do you step in to assist or to lead.   Have you served in a Lodge office, whether elected or appointed?

Being responsible to your Lodge.   Members come and go.   Some drop out.   Some move away or pass away.   The individual human lifetime is finite.   Lodges, however, can continue for generations.   Fraternal orders can live on for centuries.   For a Lodge to sustain itself and to continue year after year and decade after decade, it is required that the next generation of members be brought into the fold.   And that, my friend, is your responsibility.   Bringing in new members is the job of each and every one of us.   As an Odd Fellow, you can’t just sit back and rely on the Noble Grand, or the Membership Chair, or someone else in the Lodge.   Simply put, if each of us brought in just one new member every two years, this Order would have no membership problem.   When was the last time you sponsored a new Odd Fellow?

F – L – T

Dave Rosenberg
Past Grand Master
Jurisdiction of California
Independent Order of Odd Fellows (IOOF)

How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge

How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge

​This article is dedicated to the following subject: How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge. So, fair warning. If your Odd Fellows Lodge is satisfied with a membership of Septuagenarians and has no interest in bringing in new generations of members,...

5 Points To Improve Your Odd Fellows Lodge

5 Points To Improve Your Odd Fellows Lodge

A lot of Odd Fellows and Rebekahs from around California and, frankly, from other jurisdictions write to me. Most of the messages are supportive and positive. They hear our message of change and evolution, the energy and the power that comes from being active members...

Live Better In An Active Odd Fellows Lodge

Live Better In An Active Odd Fellows Lodge

In the articles appearing in this DMC Newsletter, we have often opined that the most successful Lodges are places that are fun for the members, socially active and involved in the community. These are the Lodges that will sustain themselves, thrive and grow. But now...

10 Helpful Hints To Bring New Members Into The Order

10 Helpful Hints To Bring New Members Into The Order

By Dave Rosenberg, Past Grand of Davis Lodge #169, Independent Order of Odd Fellows

Most of you who read this article will have been Odd Fellows longer (perhaps far longer) than I have been. I’m a relatively new member of the Order, having been initiated in March of 2004. So, as I write this article, I’ve been an Odd Fellow for about seven years. And yet, I am asked, again and again, for advice on how to bring new members into the Order. In response to these many requests, I’ve been urged to write this article. And, ladies and gentlemen, we absolutely have to recruit new members – Odd Fellowship in California has now dropped 90% in membership since WW II, and we have less than 5,000 dues-paying members. This situation is unsustainable, and – as Lodges diminish in membership – is causing innumerable problems throughout the state.

I suppose that I’m asked for advice because I have, personally, brought so many new members into Odd Fellowship. Specifically, I’ve sponsored about 100 new members. In 2009, the Sovereign Grand Lodge recognized me as #2 in the SGL jurisdiction in bringing in new members; and in 2010, SGL recognized me as #1 in the jurisdiction. I am a member of the Grand Lodge’s Membership Committee, and I’ve developed a “Membership Development Workshop” which, by the way, Grand Lodge has available to anyone who wants it, on a DVD. I serve as the Chair of my own Lodge’s Membership and Initiation Committee.

Yet, I do not profess to say how YOU or YOUR Lodge should recruit new members. Frankly, that’s up to YOU to determine. What I can do is give you some helpful hints that have worked for me. If those hints happen to make sense to you, or fit your style, or you wish to try them out, then please do! So, without further ado, here’s Dave Rosenberg’s 10 Helpful Hints to Recruiting New Members into the Order:

Recruitment on the Brain

The single most effective tool in recruiting new members is to have “recruitment on the brain” at all times. Talking to potential new members is not an occasional thing – it has to be a constant thing. When I meet new folks, I size them up, assess them, get to know them, and often ask them to consider applying for membership to the Lodge. For example, we recently hired a contractor to do some work at our Lodge Hall. After getting to know him, I talked to him about Odd Fellowship, and invited him to apply. He did. And I never give up. I talked to one woman for over five years about joining the Lodge. Recently, she did. I constantly carry application forms in my pocket. You never know when you may need one.

Functions at the Lodge

One of the absolute best tools for recruitment is to have an active Lodge. Most of the new members I have recruited have first come into contact with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows through Lodge functions. They come to the function, have fun, meet members and are curious about Odd Fellowship. I have recruited dozens of new members who first came in contact with the Lodge through our community events such as “Breakfast with Santa” or who came to the Lodge as a guest of a member during our annual “OddtoberFest” or when we rented a bus to visit wineries in Amador County. Active Lodges create opportunities to recruit.

Husbands and Wives

I have found that one of the best draws for new members is to make it user-friendly for husbands and wives (or significant others), and also for young parents with children. Very few organizations offer couples the ability to work and play together. Odd Fellowship does. Those Odd Fellows Lodges that restrict membership, or discourage membership of women, have cut off 50% of the population. Those Lodges that fail to recruit young parents have cut themselves off from a large segment of the community.

Community Support

The regalia, ritual, grips, passwords, and symbols of Odd Fellowship make us unique and distinguish us as a fraternal order. They should and will always be with us. However, virtually no one joins because of that. A full appreciation of the ritual will develop over time. But, frankly, most folks are drawn to IOOF when the Lodge engages in local community support. New members want to be part of good works in the community – whether it’s feeding hungry people, or working with people with developmental disabilities, or planting trees. When a Lodge engages in active community support activities, that Lodge opens a gateway to recruitment.

Good Fellowship

The other draw for potential new members is good fellowship activities within the Lodge. People today seek a social network and a fun place to enjoy activities with others. When Lodges have a full slate of social activities, recruitment of new members is dramatically enhanced. My Lodge, for example, hosts music events, good fellowship “Lodge Nights”, an “OddtoberFest”, a Halloween Party, and numerous other social events for members and potential new members. Let’s not forget that Odd Fellowship was started in Old England in pubs.

Social Meetings

Social meetings are not prohibited by the Code of Odd Fellowship, and in fact, are encouraged by Grand Lodge. What’s a social meeting? It is simply a meeting of the Lodge where no regalia are worn, no ritual is employed, and no secret signs, grips or passwords are used. Lodges that engage in social meetings have another huge technique available to them for recruitment. Potential new members can attend, can see what the Lodge is up to, and can meet members.

Don’t Make it Easy

There are Lodges that are so desperate for new members that when they get one, they immediately rush into an initiation. And then, once initiated, that new member is plunged into a formal, ritual meeting, and often the Lodge never sees him/her again. In my Lodge, the process of joining (we call it the “pledge period”) takes at least 5-6 months, the applicants (we call them “pledges”) have a number of requirements to accomplish before the interviewing committee and membership even vote on them. This makes the goal of membership a valuable goal for them – plus it gives them a chance to meet the members and for the members to meet them – to determine if Odd Fellowship is the right fit.

Diversity

The strength of America is its diversity. That should be the strength of Odd Fellowship, as well. When I recruit new members, I am looking for diversity in age, ethnicity, employment and gender. I want the Lodge to look like my community. It’s particularly important to bring in new members in their 20’s and 30’s. They are the next generation of Odd Fellowship. When a Lodge’s members are all in their 60’s and 70’s and older, it’s virtually impossible to attract the younger generation we need to grow.

Leadership

A critical factor to growth of a Lodge is the ability to attract community leaders. A century ago, everybody who was anybody in town was an Odd Fellow. We lost that edge over time. But, if you can attract one or two community leaders, those leaders will attract others. Members who are recognized leaders in the community will elevate the status of the Lodge and open the Lodge up to new memberships. In my Lodge, for example, we have elected city and county officials, school board members, the police chief, several judges, the district attorney and public defender, and so on. What a great recruitment tool you have when you can tell prospective members that your Lodge is the Who’s Who of the community.

Mentors

It’s important not only to attract new applicants, but to keep them in the process and to actually initiate them. In this regard, it’s useful to appoint a Mentor for each new pledge. The Mentor may be an experienced member, but often it’s better to have a relatively new member Mentor the pledge. The Mentor acts as a big brother or big sister, a buddy, available to answer questions and to introduce the applicant to other members. An effective Mentor system can really help move the applicant into membership.

Recruitment of new members is a job for each of us in this great and ancient Order. We can’t just sit back and wait for the “other guy” to do it. YOU are the other guy.

How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge

How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge

​This article is dedicated to the following subject: How to Bring Younger Members into Your Odd Fellows Lodge. So, fair warning. If your Odd Fellows Lodge is satisfied with a membership of Septuagenarians and has no interest in bringing in new generations of members,...

5 Points To Improve Your Odd Fellows Lodge

5 Points To Improve Your Odd Fellows Lodge

A lot of Odd Fellows and Rebekahs from around California and, frankly, from other jurisdictions write to me. Most of the messages are supportive and positive. They hear our message of change and evolution, the energy and the power that comes from being active members...

Live Better In An Active Odd Fellows Lodge

Live Better In An Active Odd Fellows Lodge

In the articles appearing in this DMC Newsletter, we have often opined that the most successful Lodges are places that are fun for the members, socially active and involved in the community. These are the Lodges that will sustain themselves, thrive and grow. But now...